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Federal Reserve - (18BC27)

Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view.



Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view.
Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware
Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. These seven Bennington or “Bennies” marbles were all found in the cellar of a collapsed building.Note the round pockmarks typical of Benningtons on several of the marbles - click on image to see larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble with barely visible painted floral motif in blue and green. Similar marbles have been found in archaeological contexts dating c. 1850-1910 (Carskadden and Gartley 1990) - Click images for larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble with painted bull’s eye and repeating leaf pattern motif around the circumference. Similar marbles have been found in archaeological contexts dating c. 1850-1860 (Carskadden and Gartley 1990). The painted motif is almost entirely worn off of this porcelain marble - Click images for larger view.
Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware Porcelain Porcelain

Feature 31-
Brick Lined Privy
Unglazed porcelain marble decorated with intersecting sets of parallel lines in red and green. This decorative motif was common from c.1850 to 1910 - click image to see larger view.

Various stone marbles from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Various stone marbles from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view.
Porcelain Stone group. Stone Stone Stone
18BC27 - Handmade glass marble in a variety known as solid core swirl. Dates from the 1850s through at least the 1890s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:127-129). Cut-off marks visible at either “pole” of the marble (at the center of the overall marble photo and the small central scar in the detail shot to the right) - click on image to see larger view of both. 18BC27 - Handmade glass marble in a variety known as solid core swirl. Dates from the 1850s through at least the 1890s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:127-129). Cut-off marks visible at either “pole” of the marble (at the center of the overall marble photo and the small central scar in the detail shot to the right) - click on image to see larger view of both.



18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view.
Handmade glass Close-up of cut-off marks. Machine made glass Machine made glass Machine made glass
18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view.
Machine made glass Machine made glass Machine made glass Machine made glass Machine made glass
18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view.       18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types grouped (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view.
Machine made glass     Machine made glass group

H & S Bakery (18BC32)
Feature 6, Pit Feature – Possible Privy

 

  18BC32 - Machine made glass marble Akro Spiral variety  as depicted in Randall and Webb (1988:47), Dates from the 1920s to the 1940s - click image to see larger view.    

 

  Machine made glass  

Levering Coffee House - (18BC51)
Feature 30 – Cellar Fill

 

  Unglazed porcelain marble with a spray of leaves in combination with parallel lines. This decorative motif occurs throughout period c. 1850-1910 , but the color palette of blue, dark green and red, as well as the fact that it is unglazed, suggests that this marble dates to the 1850s-1860s (Carskadden and Gartley 1990:67) - Click images for larger view.    
    Porcelain    

Privy 19A01 - (18BC80)
Late 19th to early 20th centuries

Variegated clay marble known as Jasper - click on image to see larger view.

Variegated clay marble known as Jasper - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware caramel glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware caramel glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware blue glazed Bennington - click image to see larger view.
Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware
Unglazed porcelain marble with painted bull’s eye motif. Marbles with this type of bull’s eye with a repeating leaf pattern around the circumference have been found in archaeological contexts dating c. 1850-1860 (Carskadden and Gartley 1990) - Click images for larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble decorated with intersecting sets of parallel lines in orange and green.This decorative motif was common from c.1850 to 1910 - Click images for larger view. 18BC80 - Front and side views of sulphide marble with an owl figurine. There is much damage to the surface of this marble, suggesting it was well-used - click on image to see larger view. 18BC80 - Front and side views of sulphide marble with an owl figurine. There is much damage to the surface of this marble, suggesting it was well-used - click on image to see larger view. 18BC27 -Machine made glass marbles, various types - from group shot above -  - click image to see larger view.
Porcelain Porcelain Sulphide Glass Sulphide Glass Machine made glass

Smith St. Leonard - (18CV91)
Occupied c. 1711-1749

 

  Limestone marble. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93).  Since occupation at this site dated circa 1711-1749, this artifact represents  an early example of a limestone marble in the American colonies - click on image to see larger view.    

 

  Stone    

Queenstown Courthouse - (18QU124)
Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s).
Earthenware Earthenware Earthenware Earthenware Earthenware
Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Painted earthenware marble. Gartley and Carskadden (1998:55) suggest that painted earthenware marbles date to the 1890s and later - click on image to see larger view. Painted earthenware marble. Gartley and Carskadden (1998:55) suggest that painted earthenware marbles date to the 1890s and later - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware brown glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware brown glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware brown glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware brown glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view.
Earthenware Earthenware Painted earthenware Stoneware Stoneware
Stoneware brown glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware brown glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. This appears to be glazed stoneware marble - click on image to see larger view. This appears to be glazed stoneware marble - click on image to see larger view. This appears to be glazed stoneware marble - click on image to see larger view. This appears to be glazed stoneware marble - click on image to see larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble decorated with intersecting sets of parallel lines in red, blue and green. This decorative motif was common from c. 1850 to 1910, although the color combination and unglazed condition of marble suggest a c. 1850s-1860s date - Click images for larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble decorated with intersecting sets of parallel lines in red, blue and green. This decorative motif was common from c. 1850 to 1910, although the color combination and unglazed condition of marble suggest a c. 1850s-1860s date - Click images for larger view.
Stoneware Stoneware Stoneware   Porcelain
Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view.  
Dyed Stone Stone Stone Stone  
18QU124 - Handmade glass marble in a variety known as solid core swirl. Dates from the 1850s through at least the 1890s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:127-129). Cut-off marks visible at either “pole” of the marble (along the marble edges at the left and right center on this photograph) - click on image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble Akro Spiral variety  as depicted in Randall and Webb (1988:47). Dates from the 1920s to the 1940s - click image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble Patched marble.  Late 1920s-mid-1950s (Randall and Webb 1988:43). Two patches of different colors, generally on an opaque white body - click image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble, single color blue opaque.  These marbles occasionally have minor swirling patterns due to incomplete mixing of the glass.  Introduced in early 1920s and continuing production to present (Randall and Webb 1988:34-35) - click image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble, single color yellow opaque.  These marbles occasionally have minor swirling patterns due to incomplete mixing of the glass.  Introduced in early 1920s and continuing production to present (Randall and Webb 1988:34-35) - click image to see larger view.
Handmade glass Machine made glass Machine made glass Machine made glass Machine made glass

Private Collections
Photo of similar sulphide marble with an owl figurine from a private collection shown to the right of the18BC80 sulphite marble - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view.
Sulphide Glass Sulphide Glass Sulphide Glass Sulphide Glass Sulphide Glass
Codd marble from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. Group of Codd marbles - water worn from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. Codd marbles alongside more conventional bottle stoppers - water worn, found at http://devonseaglass.wordpress.com/2011/02/18/codd-bottles/ - click image to see larger view. Machine made marbles. Cat eye glass marbles. These marbles have internal strands or ribbons of colors. Cat eye marbles were introduced around 1951 (Randall and Webb 1988:45). Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view. Private collection - Machine made glass marble. Dappled or mottled surface glass marbles began production around 1983 (Randall and Webb 1988:41), Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view.
Codd Stopper Glass Codd Stopper Glass Codd Stopper Glass Machine made glass Machine made glass
  Private collection - Machine made glass marble. Spotted or dotted surface glass marbles began production around 1983 (Randall and Webb 1988:41), Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view. Private collection - Machine made glass marbles.Clear or transparent marbles were produced from the 1920s to the present (Randall and Webb 1988:35).  Single color marbles that are transparent, with occasional minor swirling in  glass from incomplete mixing. Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view. Private collection - Machine made glass marbles.  Patched marble.  Late 1920s-mid-1950s, two patches of different colors, generally on an opaque white body (Randall and Webb 1988:43) - click image to see larger view.  
  Machine made glass Machine made glass Machine made glass  


Copyright © 2011 by Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab
Updated:  12/31/12

Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. Bennington or “Bennies” marble found in the cellar of a collapsed building - click image to see a larger view. These seven Bennington or “Bennies” marbles were all found in the cellar of a collapsed building.Note the round pockmarks typical of Benningtons on several of the marbles - click on image to see larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble with barely visible painted floral motif in blue and green. Similar marbles have been found in archaeological contexts dating c. 1850-1910 (Carskadden and Gartley 1990) - Click images for larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble with painted bull’s eye and repeating leaf pattern motif around the circumference. Similar marbles have been found in archaeological contexts dating c. 1850-1860 (Carskadden and Gartley 1990). The painted motif is almost entirely worn off of this porcelain marble - Click images for larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Handmade glass marble in a variety known as solid core swirl. Dates from the 1850s through at least the 1890s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:127-129). Cut-off marks visible at either “pole” of the marble (at the center of the overall marble photo and the small central scar in the detail shot to the right) - click on image to see larger view of both. 18BC27 - Handmade glass marble in a variety known as solid core swirl. Dates from the 1850s through at least the 1890s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:127-129). Cut-off marks visible at either “pole” of the marble (at the center of the overall marble photo and the small central scar in the detail shot to the right) - click on image to see larger view of both. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC27 - Machine made glass marbles, various types grouped (primarily patched and cat eye) - click image to see larger view. 18BC32 - Machine made glass marble Akro Spiral variety  as depicted in Randall and Webb (1988:47), Dates from the 1920s to the 1940s - click image to see larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble with a spray of leaves in combination with parallel lines. This decorative motif occurs throughout period c. 1850-1910 , but the color palette of blue, dark green and red, as well as the fact that it is unglazed, suggests that this marble dates to the 1850s-1860s (Carskadden and Gartley 1990:67) - Click images for larger view. Variegated clay marble known as Jasper - click on image to see larger view. Variegated clay marble known as Jasper - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware caramel glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware caramel glazed Bennington - click on image to see larger view. Stoneware blue glazed Bennington - click image to see larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble with painted bull’s eye motif. Marbles with this type of bull’s eye with a repeating leaf pattern around the circumference have been found in archaeological contexts dating c. 1850-1860 (Carskadden and Gartley 1990) - Click images for larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble decorated with intersecting sets of parallel lines in orange and green.This decorative motif was common from c.1850 to 1910 - Click images for larger view. 18BC80 - Front and side views of sulphide marble with an owl figurine. There is much damage to the surface of this marble, suggesting it was well-used - click on image to see larger view. 18BC80 - Front and side views of sulphide marble with an owl figurine. There is much damage to the surface of this marble, suggesting it was well-used - click on image to see larger view. 18BC27 -Machine made glass marbles, various types - from group shot above -  - click image to see larger view. Limestone marble. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93).  Since occupation at this site dated circa 1711-1749, this artifact represents  an early example of a limestone marble in the American colonies - click on image to see larger view. Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). Common brown-bodied earthenware marbles (mid 18th century to 1930s). 18QU124 - Handmade glass marble in a variety known as solid core swirl. Dates from the 1850s through at least the 1890s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:127-129). Cut-off marks visible at either “pole” of the marble (along the marble edges at the left and right center on this photograph) - click on image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble Akro Spiral variety  as depicted in Randall and Webb (1988:47). Dates from the 1920s to the 1940s - click image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble Patched marble.  Late 1920s-mid-1950s (Randall and Webb 1988:43). Two patches of different colors, generally on an opaque white body - click image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble, single color blue opaque.  These marbles occasionally have minor swirling patterns due to incomplete mixing of the glass.  Introduced in early 1920s and continuing production to present (Randall and Webb 1988:34-35) - click image to see larger view. 18QU124 - Machine made glass marble, single color yellow opaque.  These marbles occasionally have minor swirling patterns due to incomplete mixing of the glass.  Introduced in early 1920s and continuing production to present (Randall and Webb 1988:34-35) - click image to see larger view. Photo of similar sulphide marble with an owl figurine from a private collection shown to the right of the18BC80 sulphite marble - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. More examples of Sulphide Marbles - from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. Codd marble from a private collection - click on image to see larger view. Codd marbles alongside more conventional bottle stoppers - water worn, found at http://devonseaglass.wordpress.com/2011/02/18/codd-bottles/ - click image to see larger view. Machine made marbles. Cat eye glass marbles. These marbles have internal strands or ribbons of colors. Cat eye marbles were introduced around 1951 (Randall and Webb 1988:45). Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view. Private collection - Machine made glass marble. Dappled or mottled surface glass marbles began production around 1983 (Randall and Webb 1988:41), Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view. Private collection - Machine made glass marble. Spotted or dotted surface glass marbles began production around 1983 (Randall and Webb 1988:41), Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view. Private collection - Machine made glass marbles.Clear or transparent marbles were produced from the 1920s to the present (Randall and Webb 1988:35).  Single color marbles that are transparent, with occasional minor swirling in  glass from incomplete mixing. Donated to MAC Lab from private collection - click image to see larger view. Private collection - Machine made glass marbles.  Patched marble.  Late 1920s-mid-1950s, two patches of different colors, generally on an opaque white body (Randall and Webb 1988:43) - click image to see larger view. Unglazed porcelain marble decorated with intersecting sets of parallel lines in red and green. This decorative motif was common from c.1850 to 1910 - click image to see larger view.