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Stone Marbles

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Federal Reserve Site (18BC27)
Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Various stone marbles from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view.
Stone marbles from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries.



Various stone marbles from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries.

Smith St. Leonard (18CV91)
  Limestone marble. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93).  Since occupation at this site dated circa 1711-1749, this artifact represents  an early example of a limestone marble in the American colonies - click on image to see larger view.

 
  Limestone marble.
Although produced as early as 16th century in
Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North
America really didn’t begin until after 1769
(Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93). 

Since occupation at this site dated circa
1711-1749, this artifact represents 
an early example of a limestone marble
in the American colonies.
 

Queenstown Courthouse (18QU124)
Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view.Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view.Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view.
Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in
Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769
( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93).
Naturally colored yellow limestone dyed with brown (manganese). Limestone marbles were being dyed in solid colors by the 1880s, but perhaps as early as the 1850s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:101). Gartley and Carskadden also note that archaeologically-recovered examples of dyed limestone marbles are often quite faded, as is this example - click on image to see larger view.
Naturally colored yellow limestone dyed with brown (manganese). Limestone marbles were being dyed in solid colors by the 1880s, but perhaps as early as the 1850s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:101).  Gartley and Carskadden also note that archaeologically-recovered examples of dyed limestone marbles are often
quite faded, as is this example.


Copyright © 2011 by Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab
Updated:  12/31/12

 

Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Stone marble from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Various stone marbles from a cellar filled in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries - click on image to see larger view. Limestone marble. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93).  Since occupation at this site dated circa 1711-1749, this artifact represents  an early example of a limestone marble in the American colonies - click on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored grey and yellow limestone marbles. Although produced as early as 16th century in Europe, importation of limestone marbles to North America really didn’t begin until after 1769 ( Gartley and Carskadden 1998:93) - clcik on image to see larger view. Naturally colored yellow limestone dyed with brown (manganese). Limestone marbles were being dyed in solid colors by the 1880s, but perhaps as early as the 1850s (Gartley and Carskadden 1998:101). Gartley and Carskadden also note that archaeologically-recovered examples of dyed limestone marbles are often quite faded, as is this example - click on image to see larger view.