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Sprig Molded Decorated Ware


Federal Reserve (18BC27)

Lot 5, Feature 30 Lots 278, 280, Box 8394

This vessel is representative of the inexpensive lead glazed imitations of Jasper stoneware, produced in the first half of the 19th century.

Dipped pearlware mug with greyish-brown slip, to which sprig molded figures have been applied.  This vessel is representative of the inexpensive lead glazed imitations of Jasper stoneware, produced in the first half of the 19th century.        In this closup of vessel on left, in the damaged area above the legs in the figure on the right, the unglazed greyish color of the slip is visible where portions of the sprig molded design have flaked away.

Refined white earthenware. This vessel is
representative of the inexpensive lead glazed
imitations of Jasper stoneware, produced in
the first half of the 19th century.

Dipped pearlware mug with greyish-brown slip, to which sprig molded figures have been
applied.  This vessel is representative of the in expensive lead glazed imitations of Jasper
stoneware, produced in the first half of the 19th century.

In the damaged area above the legs in the figure on the right, the unglazed greyish color of
the slip is visible where portions of the sprig molded design has flaked away.

 

Feature 28, Privy filled 1860s

 

Bone china bowl, possibly a slop bowl, with a light blue thistle and shamrock sprig molded motif.  This vessel is badly stained - possibly known as Chelsea sprig pattern, dated by the Museum Victoria in Victoria, Australia as circa 1880, based on archaeological context.

Feature 28, Privy filled 1860s

Bone china saucer with light blue floral motif.  Note that the floral basket is enclosed within a larger molded motif. Bone china saucer with light blue floral motif.  Note that the floral basket is enclosed within a larger molded motif. This panelled white granite cup has floral and classical sprig molded motifs in blue. This panelled white granite cup has floral and classical sprig molded motifs in blue.

Bone china saucer with light
blue floral motif.

 

 

Bone china bowl, possibly a slop bowl,
with a light blue thistle and shamrock sprig
molded motif. This vessel is badly stained.

Possibly known as Chelsea sprig pattern, dated
by the Museum Victoria in Victoria, Australia as
circa 1880, based on archaeological context. - http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/
items/1289834/plate-chelsea-sprig-
pattern-bone-china-circa-1880-reconstructed

This panelled white granite cup has floral
and classical sprig molded motifs in blue.

Levering Coffee House (18BC51)


(18BC80)
Privy, F19A, late 19th to early 20th century



Bone china saucer with a light blue grape sprig molded motif that has been embellished with copper luster.  A matching cup was also found in the same archaeological context.  Bone china saucer with a light blue grape sprig molded motif that has been embellished with copper luster.  A matching cup was also found in the same archaeological context.  Bone china small plate with blue grape sprig molded motif. Bone china small plate with blue grape sprig molded motif.

Bone china saucer with a light blue grape sprig molded motif that
has been embellished with copper luster.  A matching cup was also
found in the same archaeological context. The luster embellishment is quite crudely done – some areas of the sprig mold were missed altogether. A marked bone china cup and saucer (recently sold
on Ebay) bearing the same sprigged design bore the printed mark
of Adderleys Ltd., a Staffordshire firm that began operations in
1906 (Godden 1964:24).

Bone china small plate with blue grape sprig molded motif.

Courtesy of National Park Service,
National Capital Region



Queen’s ware (creamware) ashtray with sprig molded grapevine design.    Closeup detail of plate shown on left - Queen’s ware (creamware) ashtray with sprig molded grapevine design.    Printed mark “WEDGWOOD of Etruria & Barlaston, Made in England” dating after c. 1940 (Godden 1964:660).  The impressed mark reads “Wedgwood 4 C 65”, meaning that this vessel was made in April of 1965 (Godden 1964:659).
Queen's ware (creamware) ashtray with sprig molded grapevine design. Close up of detail from plate shown on the right.
Printed mark “WEDGWOOD of Etruria& Barlaston, Made in England” dating after c. 1940 (Godden 1964:660). 
The impressed mark reads “Wedgwood 4 C 65”, meaning that this vessel was made in April of 1965 (Godden 1964:659).

Belair Mansion, Bowie, Maryland
From the collections of the City of Bowie Museums


Private Collections

Bone china sugar dish with blue floral sprigging.  It is part of a largely complete teaware set previously owned by the Ogle family, former owners of Belair Museum.            The sugar dish bears the impressed mark of John Wedge Wood, in business in Staffordshire between 1841 to 1860  (Godden 1964).  Wood apparently tried to capitalize off the reputation of Josiah Wedgwood’s firm by marking his wares in a manner that could be easily be mistaken for the better known firm.  Note the small space between the G and the W in Wedgwood.  Josiah Wedgwood’s firm also never used the initial J. in their marks.
This covered tankard was made by Fulham potter John Dwight, circa 1685-1690.  This vessel is owned by the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri.  Accessed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dwight_(potter). This covered tankard was made by Fulham potter John Dwight, circa 1685-1690.  This vessel is owned by the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri.  Accessed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dwight_(potter).
Bone china sugar dish with blue floral sprigging. It is part of a largely complete teaware set
previously owned by the Ogle family, former owners of Belair Museum.

The sugar dish bears the impressed mark of John Wedge Wood, in business in Staffordshire
between 1841 to 1860  (Godden 1964). Makers mark shown to the right.

  Wood apparently tried to capitalize off the reputation of Josiah Wedgwood’s firm by
marking his wares in a manner that could be easily be mistaken for the better known firm.
Note the small space between the G and the W in Wedgwood.  Josiah Wedgwood’s firm also never used the initial J. in their marks.

This covered tankard was made by Fulham
potter John Dwight, circa 1685-1690.  This vessel is owned by the Nelson-Atkins Museum
of Art, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Photo accessed at http://en.wikipedia.org/
wiki/John_Dwight_(potter)


Private Collections

Sprigged jug made at the Glamorgan Pottery between 1814 and 1839. Sprigged jug made at the Glamorgan Pottery between 1814 and 1839. Dipped refined white earthenware mug with white sprig molding in a classical motif.  Although unmarked, this mug was possibly made by Engilsh potters Turner or Spode, circa 1810. Mug height: 3.5”. Dipped refined white earthenware mug with white sprig molding in a classical motif.  Although unmarked, this mug was possibly made by Engilsh potters Turner or Spode, circa 1810. Mug height: 3.5”.
165mm high,earthenware (pearlware) with three sprigged decorations,no makers mark but English Staffordshire, circa 1810.  three sprigs show grape harvest, tapping a wine barrel and two robed women with cherubs. 165mm high,earthenware (pearlware) with three sprigged decorations,no makers mark but English Staffordshire, circa 1810.  three sprigs show grape harvest, tapping a wine barrel and two robed women with cherubs.

Sprigged jug made at the Glamorgan Pottery between 1814 and 1839. This jug is in the collections of the Swansea Museum, Swansea. Height 23 cm.

Photo accessed at http://www.swanseaheritage.
net/article/gat.asp?ARTICLE_ID=90

Dipped refined white earthenware mug with
white sprig molding in a classical motif.
  Although unmarked,this mug was possibly
made by English potters Turner or Spode,
circa 1810. Mug height: 3.5”.

165mm high,earthenware (pearlware) jug
with three sprigged decorations,no makers
mark but English Staffordshire, circa 1810.

Three sprigs show grape harvest, tapping a
wine barrel and two robed women with cherubs.

 

This bone china cup in the Blue Chelsea pattern bears the post 1962 mark of Adderleys Ltd. (Godden 1964:25), attesting to the production of this type of sprig decorated ware into the second half of the twentieth century.       1962 mark of Adderleys Ltd. (Godden 1964:25) makers mark for the bone china cup shown to the left. 1962 mark of Adderleys Ltd. (Godden 1964:25) makers mark for the bone china cup shown to the left.

Pearlware jug with copper luster and three scenes of putti in chariots being pulled by lions and rams.  Circa 1810.  This vessel has no maker’s mark. Pearlware jug with copper luster and three scenes of putti in chariots being pulled by lions and rams.  Circa 1810.  This vessel has no maker’s mark.
This bone china cup in the Blue Chelsea pattern bears the post 1962 mark of Adderleys Ltd.
(Godden 1964:25), attesting to the production of this type of sprig decorated ware into the
second half of the 20th century. 1962 mark of Adderleys Ltd. (Godden 1964:25) makers
mark for the bone china cup shown to the left.

Pearlware jug with copper luster and three
scenes of putti in chariots being pulled by
lions and rams. Circa 1810. This vessel
has no maker's mark.


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This vessel is representative of the inexpensive lead glazed imitations of Jasper stoneware, produced in the first half of the 19th century. Dipped pearlware mug with greyish-brown slip, to which sprig molded figures have been applied.  This vessel is representative of the inexpensive lead glazed imitations of Jasper stoneware, produced in the first half of the 19th century. In this closup of vessel on left, in the damaged area above the legs in the figure on the right, the unglazed greyish color of the slip is visible where portions of the sprig molded design have flaked away. Bone china bowl, possibly a slop bowl, with a light blue thistle and shamrock sprig molded motif.  This vessel is badly stained - possibly known as Chelsea sprig pattern, dated by the Museum Victoria in Victoria, Australia as circa 1880, based on archaeological context. Queen’s ware (creamware) ashtray with sprig molded grapevine design. Closeup detail of plate shown on left - Queen’s ware (creamware) ashtray with sprig molded grapevine design. Printed mark “WEDGWOOD of Etruria & Barlaston, Made in England” dating after c. 1940 (Godden 1964:660).  The impressed mark reads “Wedgwood 4 C 65”, meaning that this vessel was made in April of 1965 (Godden 1964:659). Bone china sugar dish with blue floral sprigging.  It is part of a largely complete teaware set previously owned by the Ogle family, former owners of Belair Museum. The sugar dish bears the impressed mark of John Wedge Wood, in business in Staffordshire between 1841 to 1860  (Godden 1964).  Wood apparently tried to capitalize off the reputation of Josiah Wedgwood’s firm by marking his wares in a manner that could be easily be mistaken for the better known firm.  Note the small space between the G and the W in Wedgwood.  Josiah Wedgwood’s firm also never used the initial J. in their marks. This bone china cup in the Blue Chelsea pattern bears the post 1962 mark of Adderleys Ltd. (Godden 1964:25), attesting to the production of this type of sprig decorated ware into the second half of the twentieth century.

Copyright © 2002 by Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab
Updated:  10/31/16