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Agateware

Thrown agate -


Victualling Warehouse  18AP14
c. 1737 - 1900


Angelic Knoll 18CV60
c. 1650 - 1770



Agate doorknob. Photo on right shows agatized body on a broken surface, as well as the indention where the doorknob hardware was inserted - from 18AP14 Victualling Warehouse.    Agate doorknob. Photo on right shows agatized body on a broken surface, as well as the indention where the doorknob hardware was inserted - from 18AP14 Victualling Warehouse. Sherd on left is from indeterminate hollow vessel and on the right is the footring of a small jug or similar vessel - from 18CV60. Sherd on left is from indeterminate hollow vessel and on the right is the footring of a small jug or similar vessel - from 18CV60.
Agate doorknob. Photo on right shows agatized body on
a broken surface, as well as the indention where the
doorknob hardware was inserted.

Sherd on left is from indeterminate hollow vessel and on
the right is the footring of a small jug or similar vessel.


Smith St. Leonard  18CV91
1711-1754 Plantation

Fragments from agateware cutlery handle, similar to complete examples shown to left.  Agateware handles were an important product for  the Whieldon-Wedgwood partnership of 1754-1759.  As early as 1749, Thomas Whieldon is recorded as supplying “32 dessert handles” (Simeon Shaw 1829).            Fragments from agateware cutlery handle from 18CV91, similar to complete examples shown to left.  Agateware handles were an important product for  the Whieldon-Wedgwood partnership of 1754-1759.  As early as 1749, Thomas Whieldon is recorded as supplying “32 dessert handles” (Simeon Shaw 1829).

Fragments from agateware cutlery handle, similar to complete examples shown to left. 
Agateware handles were an important product for  the Whieldon-Wedgwood partnership of 1754-1759. 
As early as 1749, Thomas Whieldon is recorded as supplying “32 dessert handles” (Simeon Shaw 1829).


Queenstown Courthouse 18QU124


Hanley 6

Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire, England.
Cannot be attributed to a specific pottery.



These agateware sherds are from an indeterminate hollow vessel from 18QU124-Queenstown Courthouse site. These agateware sherds are from an indeterminate hollow vessel from 18QU124-Queenstown Courthouse site. Unidentified hollow vessel in thrown agate - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire, England, cannot be attributed to a specific pottery. Unidentified hollow vessel in thrown agate - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire, England, cannot be attributed to a specific pottery.
These sherds are from an indeterminate hollow vessel.

Unidentified hollow vessel in thrown agate.


Hanley 9

Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire, England. Cannot be attributed to a specific pottery.


Biscuit fired thrown agateware sherd in unidentified hollow form, probably a teapot or jug.  This waster sherd is comprised of the blending of three different clay colors and was discarded prior to glazing - Agateware was one of the first earthenware ceramics to be fired twice: the first firing produced an unglazed, biscuit-fired vessel, which was then glazed and fired a second time - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire in Hanley.  Cannot be attributed to a specific pottery.

Biscuit fired thrown agateware sherd in unidentified hollow form, probably a teapot or jug.  This waster sherd is comprised of the blending of three different clay colors and was discarded prior to glazing - Agateware was one of the first earthenware ceramics to be fired twice: the first firing produced an unglazed, biscuit-fired vessel, which was then glazed and fired a second time - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire in Hanley.  Cannot be attributed to a specific pottery.

Unidentified hollow vessel in thrown agate - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in StaffordshireCannot be attributed to a specific pottery.

Biscuit fired thrown agateware sherd in
unidentified hollow form, probably a teapot
or jug.  This waster sherd is comprised of the
blending of three different clay colors and
was discarded prior to glazing.

Biscuit fired thrown agateware sherd from a
saucer.  This waster sherd is comprised of
the blending of three different clay colors and
was discarded before being lead glazed
and fired a second time.

  Unidentified hollow vessel in thrown agate.





Private Collection

Agateware (or mineral) doorknobs  appear regularly in hardware trade catalogs during the second half of the nineteenth century; Examples can be found in the Illustrated Catalogue of American Hardware of the Russell Erwin Manufacturing Company, 1865, as well as other hardware catalogs. Agateware (or mineral) doorknobs  appear regularly in hardware trade catalogs during the second half of the nineteenth century; Examples can be found in the Illustrated Catalogue of American Hardware of the Russell Erwin Manufacturing Company, 1865, as well as other hardware catalogs. This undated illustration from a second half of the nineteenth century trade catalog was taken from A Price Guide to Victorian Houseware Hardware and Kitchenware.  Ronald S. Barlow.  Windmill Publishing Company, 1992.

Agateware (or mineral) doorknobs  appear regularly in hardware trade catalogs during
the second half of the nineteenth century. 

Examples can be found in the Illustrated Catalogue of American Hardware of the Russell Erwin Manufacturing Company, 1865, as well as other hardware catalogs.

This undated illustration from a second half
of the nineteenth century trade catalog was
taken from A Price Guide to Victorian
Houseware Hardware and Kitchenware.
  Ronald S. Barlow. Windmill Publishing Company, 1992.


This covered salt glazed stoneware  tankard was made by Fulham potter John Dwight, circa 1685-1690. The figural and floral elements are sprig molded designs- This vessel is owned by the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri.  Accessed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dwight_(potter). This thrown agateware teapot lid clearly shows the spiraled effect of the different clays, created by forming the vessel on a potter’s wheel - George L. Miller Collection at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory.  Gift from David Barker. This thrown agateware teapot lid clearly shows the spiraled effect of the different clays, created by forming the vessel on a potter’s wheel - George L. Miller Collection at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory.  Gift from David Barker.

Laid Agate -

Lead-glazed agateware cream jug, Staffordshire, ca. 1750.  H. 10". The body of this jug was formed in a two piece press mold.  (Chipstone Foundation.) Lead-glazed agateware cream jug, Staffordshire, ca. 1750.  H. 10". The body of this jug was formed in a two piece press mold.  (Chipstone Foundation.)

This covered salt glazed stoneware  tankard
was made by Fulham potter John Dwight,
circa 1685-1690. The figural and floral
elements are sprig molded designs.

This vessel is owned by the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri. Accessed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
John_Dwight_(potter)


This thrown agateware teapot lid
clearly shows the spiraled effect of
the different clays, created by forming
the vessel on a potter’s wheel. George
L. Miller Collection at the Maryland
Archaeological Conservation
Laboratory.  Gift from David Barker.

Lead-glazed agateware cream jug,
Staffordshire, ca. 1750.  H. 10".
The body of this jug was formed in a two
piece press mold.  (Chipstone Foundation.)

http://www.chipstone.org/images.php/78/
Ceramics-in-America-2003/Swirls-and-
Whirls:-English-Agateware-Technology


Back to: Top | Ware Description


Copyright 2002 by Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab

Updated: 02/28/15

Teapot lid with enamelled floral motif in red and green. 3.00” rim diameter from 18BC27. Unidentified hollow vessel sherd with enamelled leaf motif in green and red from 18BC27. Saucer painted overglaze in red and brown from 18BC27. Overglaze painted blue band on rim, unidentifed vessel from HanleySite-Staffordshire, England. Overglaze painted scalloped border motif in blue. Probable tureen lid from HanleySite-Staffordshire England. Saucer, overglaze painted in black and yellow in Greek Key or fret motif (Mankowitz p. 39), collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Saucer, overglaze painted in black and yellow in Greek Key or fret motif (Mankowitz p. 39), collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Bowl with interior rim painted in brown enamelled “egg and dart” or “ egg and tongue” motif, 12.5” rim diameter  collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Bowl with interior rim painted in brown enamelled “egg and dart” or “ egg and tongue” motif, 12.5” rim diameter collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986.  Saucer, 5.0” rim diameter, painted in brown enamelled motif collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Cup, painted in leaf and berry motif in overglaze enamels collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Bowl, painted on exterior in black underglaze geometric motif, 7.5” rim diameter) collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Oval hollow form, probable tureen, with painted overglaze brown bands collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Oval baker with brown enamelled rim border collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Saucer with brown enamelled rim border, 6.5” rim diameter collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Enamelled Table Service Drawing Book, Plate 904 n.d., from Leeds Pattern Book. Enamelled Table Service Drawing Book, Plate 915 n.d., from Leeds Pattern Book. Overglaze printed creamware  teapot sherds from 18AN39. Bat transfer printed body sherds, vessel #6212 from 18PR175. Bat transfer printed body sherds, vessel #6213 from 18PR175. Engine turned creamware mug with green rouletted bands- c. 1800 from a Private collection. Creamware pitcher with sprig molded designs on a marbleized variegated surface - Private collection. Top view of unglazed waster spoon bowl Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire, England. Side view of unglazed waster spoon bowl Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire, England. Illustration from Griffin 2005:130 Shown as teaspoon or mustard spoon (Number 129) in Leeds Pottery book first published in 1783 and reprinted in 1794. Molded creamware dolphin body collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire, England, possibly part of candlestick similar to one shown (middle) in 1794 edition of Designs of Sundry Articles of Queen’s or Cream-Colour’d Earthenware. Could also be part of a tazza (right). Leeds Example p. 128 of Dolphin body candlestick. Dolphin Tazza shown on right from http://www.historicfood.com/ Unidentified hollow form with a rolled rim, 5” rim diameter collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Unidentified hollow vessel, 4.5” rim diameter. Possible butter tub (P, 182 leeds book volume I) or top pan for a veilleuse 9 see Buten Wedgwood book page 50 collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Small mold – jelly, blancmange or flummery collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Unidentified hollow vessel with strainer and spout, 8” rim diameter. Note footring at base of vessel in right photo. Dairy ware – cheese making? Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Unidentified hollow vessel with strainer and spout, 8” rim diameter. Note footring at base of vessel in right photo. Dairy ware – cheese making? Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Dairy cream separator. 19th century Irish dairy creamer. Milk strainer pail c. 1870s Small ladle, 2.0” diameter. Probably for gravy or sauce. Possibly like the illustration on the right.Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Small ladle, 2.0” diameter. Probably for gravy or sauce. Possibly like the illustration on the right.Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Small ladle, 2.0” diameter. Probably for gravy or sauce. Possibly like the illustration on the right. Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986 Illustration from 1790 Wedgwood catalogue (Mankowitz). Possible basket stand. Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Round hollow vessel, 2.75” rim diameter. Probable sweetmeat dish, possibly similar to illustration on right. Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Illustration from Wedgwood 1790 catalogue of creamware shapes. Mankowitz : plate 6. Eye Cup, example on right shown on page 148 of Leeds book - Designs of Sundry Articles of Queen’s or Cream-Colour’d Earthenware (1814 edition). #216 , Collected at site of Neale & Co. and Wilson (active 1778-1816) by George Miller in 1986. Eye Cup from page 148 of Leeds book - Designs of Sundry Articles of Queen’s or Cream-Colour’d Earthenware (1814 edition). #216 Undecorated, oval dish with straight sides, 1.5” tall. Possibly a dish for potted meat. Collected by George Miller at site of Ridgway and Abington in Hanley in 1986. Agate doorknob. Photo on right shows agatized body on a broken surface, as well as the indention where the doorknob hardware was inserted - from 18AP14 Victualling Warehouse. Agate doorknob. Photo on right shows agatized body on a broken surface, as well as the indention where the doorknob hardware was inserted - from 18AP14 Victualling Warehouse. Fragments from agateware cutlery handle, similar to complete examples shown to left.  Agateware handles were an important product for  the Whieldon-Wedgwood partnership of 1754-1759.  As early as 1749, Thomas Whieldon is recorded as supplying “32 dessert handles” (Simeon Shaw 1829). Fragments from agateware cutlery handle, similar to complete examples shown to left.  Agateware handles were an important product for  the Whieldon-Wedgwood partnership of 1754-1759.  As early as 1749, Thomas Whieldon is recorded as supplying “32 dessert handles” (Simeon Shaw 1829). Biscuit fired thrown agateware sherd in unidentified hollow form, probably a teapot or jug.  This waster sherd is comprised of the blending of three different clay colors and was discarded prior to glazing - Agateware was one of the first earthenware ceramics to be fired twice: the first firing produced an unglazed, biscuit-fired vessel, which was then glazed and fired a second time - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire in Hanley.  Cannot be attributed to a specific pottery.   Biscuit fired thrown agateware sherd in unidentified hollow form, probably a teapot or jug.  This waster sherd is comprised of the blending of three different clay colors and was discarded prior to glazing - Agateware was one of the first earthenware ceramics to be fired twice: the first firing produced an unglazed, biscuit-fired vessel, which was then glazed and fired a second time - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in Staffordshire in Hanley.  Cannot be attributed to a specific pottery. Unidentified hollow vessel in thrown agate - Collected by George L. Miller in 1986 in StaffordshireCannot be attributed to a specific pottery. Agateware (or mineral) doorknobs  appear regularly in hardware trade catalogs during the second half of the nineteenth century; Examples can be found in the Illustrated Catalogue of American Hardware of the Russell Erwin Manufacturing Company, 1865, as well as other hardware catalogs. Agateware (or mineral) doorknobs  appear regularly in hardware trade catalogs during the second half of the nineteenth century; Examples can be found in the Illustrated Catalogue of American Hardware of the Russell Erwin Manufacturing Company, 1865, as well as other hardware catalogs. This covered salt glazed stoneware  tankard was made by Fulham potter John Dwight, circa 1685-1690. The figural and floral elements are sprig molded designs- This vessel is owned by the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri.  Accessed at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dwight_(potter). Cannot be attributed to a specific pottery.