About the Site and How to Use It

About the Site

This database and web site was produced as part of two projects: Developing a Computerized Catalog for the State of Maryland’s Archaeological Collections, undertaken by the MAC Lab between 2001 and 2003, and Developing a Records Catalog Database for the State of Maryland’s Archaeological Collections, undertaken between 2005 and 2007. Both projects were funded by generous grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (www.neh.gov), the Maryland Historical Trust (www.mht.maryland.gov), the Maryland State Highway Administration (www.roads.maryland.gov), and the Academy of Natural Science’s Estuarine Research Center (www.ansp.org).

The database contains 32 archaeological sites, both prehistoric and historic. It is composed of over 30,000 documents (field and artifact records), over 11,000 images (slides and prints), and almost 1000 PDF documents containing over 66,000 individual pages. There is also a database of over 222,000 artifact records.

How to Use the Site

FINDING AIDS are the easiest way to browse a particular site. Each finding aid contains a textual description of the site, along with (at the bottom) a clickable listing of all the digital resources.

The right menu provides several other ways to access the data. DESCRIPTION OF SITES provides short descriptions of the 32 sites in the database. DIGITIZED MATERIAL provides, in tabular form, counts of the documents, images, PDFs, and artifacts for each site. Clicking on a site name takes you to a detailed listing of the digital resources for that site, along with a link to the finding aid. SITE REPORTS list the draft and final archaeological report(s) for each site.

The SEARCH DOCUMENTS, SEARCH IMAGES, SEARCH PDFS, and SEARCH ARTIFACTS links present search forms for each category of data. At the top of each screen, you may either select a single site or select ALL SITES; the search form will then change to present the appropriate choices for other fields. Once you have made your choice(s), click on SEARCH to conduct the search.

The results page gives, in the case of documents and images, thumbnail images of the results. If there are more than 30 results, you may page through them using the paging bar at the top and bottom. Click on a thumbnail to get a larger image as well as detail about that record. The results page for PDFs provides a clickable list of PDFs that match the criteria; click on a link to open the PDF in a separate tab or window. The results page for artifacts presents a grid with the matching artifacts listed, again with a paging bar if needed.

Photographs of human burials and grave goods are not accessible through the on-line database. Inquiries about these images should be made to Rebecca Morehouse, Curator of State Collections, at rmorehouse@mdp.state.md.us.

The MAP GALLERY and ARTIFACT GALLERY links provide a way to directly view the site map and/or artifact gallery for each site. Click on the appropriate site to see the results. The same information is available by clicking the MAP or ARTIFACT(S) link at the bottom of each finding aid.

Finally, the ARTIFACT COMPARISONS link provides a special mechanism for inter-site comparisons of artifact counts. Select one or more artifact types from one of the following fields: MATERIAL, OBJECT TYPE, CLASS, or VARIETY. Then select one or more sites for comparison. When you finish and click CREATE CHART, an Excel spreadsheet will be created and displayed. You may save the spreadsheet to your own computer if you wish by clicking the Save or Save As options on the menu.

Other enhancements to the web site will be made in the future. To suggest an enhancement, please email Patricia Samford at psamford@mdp.state.md.us.



Thank you for visiting our web site. If you have any questions, comments,
or new information to share, please contact us at patricia.samford@maryland.gov.
 
     

An online archive of over 30 archaeological sites in Maryland, produced by the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab with the support of the National Endowment of the Humanities.